Satellite radio antennas for the home

Enjoy your favorite programming from your favorite chair

By

Matt Freeman

A circuitous path, involving England, New York, rural Michigan, Indiana, and lots of parts in between brought Matthew Freeman to Charlottesville, where he's been writing about mobile audio/video for Crutchfield off and on since early 2000. He fosters an eclectic taste in film, and is fond of a wide range of music. A native of Albuquerque, New Mexico, he found his way to the University of Notre Dame, where, in an act of charity unsurpassed in the history of Western civilization, he was given a B.A. in English.

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To get satellite radio reception in your home, you'll need a specially designed antenna that works with your satellite radio. You've got two options: indoor or outdoor. Many satellite radios, especially Dock & Play and portable, come with indoor antennas.

No matter which kind of antenna you use, you'll need to mount it in a spot that gets the best reception. If you'd like to get satellite radio in a room that typically can't get reception, consider adding a signal repeater to your system.

Indoor antennas

These compact antennas are generally mounted in or near a window in your house, preferably facing south, so that they receive the best signal possible. Satellite radios usually have antenna aiming features and signal strength meters, so you'll know when your reception is the bet. Indoor antennas are convenient, inexpensive, and easy to mount, too.

SiriusXM outdoor antenna

SiriusXM SXHA1 outdoor antenna

Outdoor antennas

If you can't get satellite signal in the house, consider an outdoor antenna. It's bigger than its indoor counterpart, and designed to resist the elements. You mount it on the side of your house, or the roof (whichever gives you optimum reception). If getting the wire from the antenna inside the house presents a challenge, you might want to consider asking an installation professional for help. If you already have a satellite TV setup, you can use a combiner/splitter package. Run the satellite radio signal through the same cable that the satellite TV dish uses to get into the house. Outside, the signals are combined. Once inside, they're split again and sent to the appropriate places.