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TV FAQ

Shopping for a TV

» What are my choices when it comes to TVs?

» I'm interested in a flat-panel LCD or plasma TV. How do I decide which type is right for me?

» I keep seeing ads for "LED TVs." Is that a different type of TV?

» What kind of TV do I need to get 3D at home?

» What size screen should I get for my room, and how far away should I sit for the best picture?

» What should I look for in a TV for gaming?

» What's better for gaming, LCD or plasma?

» How long should I expect a flat-panel TV to last?

» On some flat-panel TVs, the actual measured screen size is slightly smaller than the advertised screen size. Why is that?


TV terms and technologies

» What are the benefits of "120Hz refresh rate" and "240Hz refresh rate"?

» What's the deal with 600Hz plasmas?

» What's a good contrast ratio? 80,000:1? 1,000,000:1?

» What is 1080p?

» What do the "i" and "p" mean in picture resolution numbers?

» What is 4K?

» What is OLED?


Video sources

» Where can I find 1080p video content?

» How can I watch movies and TV shows from Netflix® and other online sources on my TV?

» How can I watch home movies and vacation photos on my TV?

» Can I surf the Internet using my TV?

» What kind of antenna do I need to receive over-the-air HD broadcasts?

» I'm a cable TV subscriber. What do I need to watch cable programs in HD?

» I'm a satellite TV subscriber. What do I need to watch satellite programs in HD?

» I'm trimming expenses and considering doing without satellite or cable TV. Do over-the-air high-def broadcasts look as good as HD cable and satellite?

» Is all high-definition TV content in the 1080i format?

» I have an HDTV, so whenever the "Available in HD" logo appears on the screen, I'm seeing a high-definition picture, right?

» Primetime shows in high definition look great on my TV, but when my local news comes on, the picture isn't as sharp, and it's not widescreen. Why is that?

» Now that my local TV stations are broadcasting digitally, how can I watch them on my old analog TV?

» Why is it that not all TVs with picture-in-picture actually let you watch two channels at once?


Getting the best picture

» How can I get rid of those black bars on my screen?

» My new TV looks much better than my old TV, but how can I make sure I'm getting the best possible picture?

» I just bought a new TV and now I want to replace my DVD player with a Blu-ray player. Will it play all my DVDs?

» Do I need to worry about screen burn-in with plasma TVs?


Setting up your TV

» What kind of video connection should I use to connect my components to my TV?

» What should I be aware of when placing my TV?

» What's involved in wall-mounting a flat-panel TV? Can I do it myself?

» Is it OK to mount my TV above my fireplace?

» How can I connect my computer to my TV?

» Should I use my receiver to make video connections?

» What kind of sound quality can I expect from flat-panel TV speakers?

» Can I use my TV's speakers as a center channel in my home theater system?


Shopping for a TV


LG%20LED%20TVNearly all current LCD TVs use LED backlighting, and are often referred to as "LED TVs."

Q: What are my choices when it comes to TVs?
A: Most of us grew up watching TVs with picture tubes inside, but the major TV makers have completely eliminated tube HDTVs. Current TV models are based on various digital display technologies. These TVs come in much larger screen sizes than old-fashioned TVs did, with connections for more types of audio/video gear, and more advanced capabilities.

When you're shopping, you'll find two basic TV categories:

For more ideas on what to look for in a TV, watch our short video guide to shopping for a TV.

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Q: I'm interested in a flat-panel LCD or plasma TV. How do I decide which type is right for me?
A: Flat-panel TVs are extremely popular due both to their elegantly thin designs and sharp, vivid picture quality. Flat-panel advantages include wide viewing angles, a bright picture that can overcome room lights or daylight, and dependable, long-lasting screens.

A plasma TV might be for you if:

  • You want really rich, warm colors and deep blacks.
  • You or others in the room will be sitting off-axis (viewing the screen from off to the sides rather than directly in front of it) when watching TV or movies.
  • Your room setup doesn't put lots of direct light on the TV screen, or if you can easily reduce the light by closing the blinds, for example.

An LCD TV might be for you if:

  • You want a TV with a screen size under 42".
  • Your TV room is relatively bright, or you do a lot of daytime viewing.
  • You're looking for ways to save energy. LCD TVs often consume less power than plasma models of the same size.

For an in-depth look at how flat-panel TVs work, see our article on LCD vs. plasma. And for tips on choosing between LCD and plasma, watch our video.

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Q: I keep seeing ads for "LED TVs." Is that a different type of TV?
A: Not really. An "LED TV" is simply an LCD TV that uses LEDs to illuminate the image instead of conventional fluorescent lights. TVs with LED backlighting generally have higher contrast ratios and more accurate colors. They're also typically more energy efficient than fluorescent-backlit sets.

For more details, check out our video about LED and fluorescent backlighting.

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3D glassesTo watch 3D at home, you need to wear 3D glasses that are compatible with your TV. If you try to watch 3D without the special glasses, all you'll see is a blurry 2D image.

Q: What kind of TV do I need to get 3D at home?
A: To enjoy 3D at home, the first thing you need is a TV or projector capable of displaying 3D content. We carry both LCD and plasma 3D TVs and LCD 3D projectors.

In addition to a 3D-capable screen, each person watching will need to wear 3D glasses. And even though most 3D TVs and projectors include basic 2D-to-3D conversion for 2D video sources, the most convincing 3D experience involves a true 3D source like a 3D Blu-ray player. Check out our intro to 3D TV technology for more info on what you need to watch 3D at home. You can also read our 3D TV FAQ for more details, including how 3D TV works and what you'll be able to watch in 3D.

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TVYour TV's screen size should depend on the size of your room and how close you'll be sitting to it.

Q: What size screen should I get for my room, and how far away should I sit for the best picture?
A: It depends on how big your room is. For a bedroom, kitchen, or office, where you'll probably be pretty close to the TV, you can go with a relatively small screen: 32" or even 26". But for the main TV in your living room or home theater, we recommend getting the largest screen that fits your budget and room. That's based on our own experiences and on feedback from our customers.

Sitting too far away from a smallish screen will reduce the impact and immediacy of the viewing experience. On the other hand, if you're too close to a large screen, you may be distracted by the screen's "pixel structure" — the grid of tiny picture elements that form the TV image. Compared to old-school tube TVs, flat-panel TVs have higher-resolution screens (and more space-efficient cabinets) that let you put a larger set in your room and/or sit much closer.

High-quality video material like DVDs and HDTV programs look amazing on these new TVs. But some people also find that noise and distortion in lower-quality analog signals (like standard broadcast and cable) are exposed and magnified. That's why our viewing distance chart (below) offers a range for each screen size. If most of your viewing is DVD-quality or better, you'll see more details by sitting closer. If you watch more lower-quality video sources, like standard-definition cable, sit farther back for a smoother picture. Watch our video about choosing TV screen size for more info.

We calculated the viewing ranges in the chart below by multiplying the screen size (measured diagonally) by 1-1/2 and 2-1/2.

Screen size Viewing distance range
26" 3.25 - 5.5 feet
32" 4.0 - 6.66 feet
37" 4.63 - 7.71 feet
40" 5.0 - 8.33 feet
42" 5.25 - 8.75 feet
46" 5.75 - 9.5 feet
50" 6.25 - 10.5 feet
52" 6.5 - 10.8 feet
55" 6.9 - 11.5 feet
58" 7.25 - 12 feet
65" 8.13 - 13.5 feet
70" 8.75 - 14.75 feet

Recommended viewing distances for high-definition TVs. We suggest a range because the ideal distance will depend on several factors, including signal quality.

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LG%20plasmaWhether you go with LCD or plasma should depend on your personal preferences and your gaming room.

Q: What should I look for in a TV for gaming?
A: That will depend on which video game console(s) you plan to use, your room and equipment setup, and what kind of gamer you are.

Both the Xbox 360™ and PlayStation® 3 can output 1080p video for games, and the PS3 can play Blu-ray Disc™ high-def movies. To take advantage of that higher resolution, consider getting a 1080p TV.

If you often play games with several friends, you might prefer a wider viewing angle; plasma TVs really excel in this arena. They also offer superb black levels, and very smooth, natural motion, and also tend to be lower in price. And while early plasma models sometimes suffered from burn-in, that's not really an issue with more recent sets. If you'll be playing in a relatively bright room, you might like the bright picture of an LCD TV, so you can play games in the daytime and still enjoy great color and contrast.

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Q: What's better for gaming, LCD or plasma?
A: Either type of TV can be great for gaming — it really depends on your preferences and what your viewing room is like.

In general, plasmas give you: 

  • smooth motion and natural-looking image depth
  • rich colors, as well as superb black levels and shadow detail — very helpful in dark scenes or environment
  • few to zero burn-in problems — today's plasmas don't have the burn-in issues early plasmas did

In general, LCDs give you:

  • a brighter picture, ideal for more brightly lit rooms
  • sizes smaller than 42", including some ultra-thin models — handy if you're shopping for a den or dorm room
  • razor-sharp detail, particularly models that offer higher 120Hz or 240Hz refresh rates

See our article on LCD vs. plasma or watch our video for more info.

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Q: How long should I expect a flat-panel TV to last?
A: The design and manufacturing of flat-panel TVs are now so advanced that today's LCD and plasma models should last as long or longer than old-fashioned tube TVs. One big reason is that new TVs are very energy efficient — they use much less power and produce much less heat than TVs from a few years ago. Excess heat is one of the main threats to the longevity of electronic components. New LCD and plasma TVs typically have a rated lifetime of 100,000 hours for the screen. Even if you had the TV on for eight hours every day, it would last over 34 years! You may decide to replace your new TV after five, ten, fifteen years or more, but it's unlikely you'll need to replace it because it has "worn out."

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Q: On some flat-panel TVs, the actual measured screen size is slightly smaller than the advertised screen size. Why is that?
A: Some TV makers list a TV's true screen size if it's different from the advertised size. This difference is only a fraction of an inch — the most common example is 32" LCDs that actually measure 31-1/2". We've not heard any official explanation for the discrepancies. It's likely just the type of rounding up that's been going on for years for products ranging from refrigerators, to car engines, to cans of soda. As with these examples, the screen size difference is nothing to be concerned about. You might notice a half-inch difference on a computer monitor but you won't on a TV.

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TV terms and technologies


Q: What are the benefits of "120Hz refresh rate" and "240Hz refresh rate"?
A: The digital display technologies (LCD, plasma, DLP, LCoS, etc.) that have replaced picture tubes are progressive-scan by nature, displaying 60 video frames per second — often referred to as "60Hz." TVs with 120Hz refresh rate use advanced video processing to double the standard display rate to 120 frames per second. Because each video frame appears for only half the normal amount of time, on-screen motion looks smoother and more fluid, with less motion blur and smearing. Some of the latest TVs have 240Hz refresh rate, which doubles the display rate again, to reduce motion blur even further. Choosing a TV with a fast refresh rate is a good idea if you watch a lot of fast-action sports and video games. You'll find fast refresh rates primarily on LCD TVs.

For a visual demo of how this anti-blur technology works, watch our video explaining refresh rates.

You might wonder why plasma TVs generally don't boast elevated refresh rates like these. Because of the way plasma TVs create a picture, they're naturally much faster than LCD TVs — they provide smooth, natural video motion without this type of video processing. See our article on LCD and plasma TVs for more info about how these display technologies work.

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Q: What's the deal with "600Hz" plasmas?
A: Plasma TVs that are labeled "600Hz" employ technology which plasma TV makers generally refer to as 600Hz sub field drive. People often assume that it's like the 120Hz and 240Hz refresh rates found on many LCD TVs, but that's not really the case. 600Hz sub field drive does help plasmas produce smooth video motion, but because of the way plasma TVs create a picture, they don't have to constantly scan and refresh the on-screen image the way LCDs do.

A plasma panel has extremely fast pixel response time — just a fraction of a millisecond. That's much faster than is needed to display the incoming video signal, which is generally 60 frames per second. So, to display a single video frame for 1/60 of a second, a plasma panel fires the pixels in pulses in order to keep all the pixels "hot" so they can continuously display the video image. A plasma with 600Hz sub field drive produces 10 pulses per frame, so the picture is being refreshed at 60 frames per second times 10 pulses per frame, which equals 600Hz. Earlier plasmas fired their pixels at 8 pulses per frame for a refresh rate of 480Hz. This super-fast sub field refresh rate allows plasma TVs to make virtually instantaneous transitions from frame to frame, which minimizes motion blur.

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Q: What's a good contrast ratio? 80,000:1? 1,000,000:1?
A: There are a couple of things to keep in mind when comparing TV contrast ratios. The first is: contrast ratio numbers are only useful in comparing TVs from the same manufacturer. This is because each manufacturer has their own way of measuring contrast ratio. So, for example, manufacturer A and manufacturer B could both measure the contrast ratio of the same TV, but come up with wildly different numbers because they're each using completely different measuring methods. Because of this, you really can't compare contrast ratios across different brands.

This also makes it more or less impossible to say what's a "good" contrast ratio. One manufacturer's top-of-the line model with deep, inky blacks might be 80,000:1, while another's entry-level model with somewhat washed out blacks might be 1,000,000:1. There's just no way to tell from the numbers alone. That's why we suggest putting the contrast ratio spec aside, and paying more attention to other things while you shop, like overall screen quality, or user reviews.

Check out our video on TV contrast ratio for more info.

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Q: What is 1080p?
A: 1080p is currently the highest HDTV screen resolution available, with 1920 x 1080 pixels and progressive scanning (see "i" vs. "p" question below). Since 1080p is higher than either of the two most common broadcast HD formats (1080i and 720p), having a 1080p TV means you can enjoy full picture resolution for all your video sources; the TV won't have to "downconvert" the signal and sacrifice detail. References to 1080p are usually about TVs rather than video source material. To learn more about HD video resolution, see our article that explains HDTV resolution, or watch our HDTV resolution video to get the basics.

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Q: What do the "i" and "p" mean in picture resolution numbers?
A: The "i" and "p" refer to the video frame rate, where "i" stands for interlaced-scan and "p" stands for progressive-scan. These terms originated when all TVs used picture tubes, and images were "scanned" — painted across the screen line by line. Interlaced-scan images required two passes to create a complete video frame, while progressive-scan displayed the entire frame with just one pass (see illustration below). The frame rate for interlaced video is 30 frames per second while progressive-scan video is usually 60 frames per second.

Interlaced Interlaced scan splits each video frame into two "fields," displaying all the even horizontal scan lines (2,4,6...) in 1/60th of a second, followed by the odd scan lines (1,3,5...) during the next 1/60th of a second. That means you'll see a complete video frame every 1/30th of a second.
Progressive Progressive scan, on the other hand, displays all the lines in a single sweep (1,2,3,4...). You'll see a complete frame every 1/60th of a second.

Today's digital TV displays are nearly all effectively progressive-scan, so interlaced and progressive are mostly relevant when describing video source signals sent to the TV. The main thing to remember is that a progressive signal has twice as much picture information as an equivalent interlaced signal, and generally looks a little more solid and stable, with on-screen motion that's more fluid.

Want to know more? See our in-depth article on HDTV resolution, or watch our HDTV resolution video to get the basics.

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Q: What is "4K"?
A: 4K is a general term for high-resolution digital displays and video formats with horizontal resolution of around 4000 pixels. 4K projectors have been used in movie theaters for many years. At the end of 2012, the first flat-panel 4K TVs appeared. These TVs, officially known as Ultra High Definition TVs, have screen resolution of 3840 horizontal pixels x 2160 vertical pixels — twice the horizontal and vertical resolution of 1080p (1920 x 1080 pixels). 4K has four times the total pixels of 1080p and is capable of creating a much more detailed picture. As of this writing (7/13) true 4K content nearly nonexistent. Sony has introduced a 4K media player that can store and play back 4K movies, but it is only compatible with Sony's own 55" and 65" X900 4K TVs. All 4K TVs include video processing that upconverts lower-resolution sources to 4K, so all video sources should look better on a 4K screen. To see the added detail 4K is capable of will require larger screens and/or sitting closer to the screen than with 1080p TVs.

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Q: What is OLED?
A: OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) is a new display technology with significant advantages over conventional plasma and LCD TV types. OLED has been used for high-end smartphone screens for a few years, but was only introduced in large-screen TVs in the second half of 2013. OLED can produce a spectacular picture that is superior to even the finest plasma and LED-LCD TVs. While LEDs have been used as backlights for LCD TVs for years, OLED (pronounced "oh-led") TVs use a completely different panel structure, with a series of organic thin films forming the pixel layers. A thin-film transistor layer has the circuitry to turn each individual pixel on and off to form an image. Because the OLED pixel layer is self-illuminating, no backlight is required. When a pixel is switched off, it is completely dark, producing infinite picture contrast and absolute black. OLED technology enables panels to be extremely thin — less than 1/4" — and lightweight.

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Video sources

Q: Where can I find 1080p video content?
A: Since so many TVs offer top-of-the-line 1080p video resolution, a lot of folks wonder what their options are for 1080p viewing. The most common 1080p content is Blu-ray movies, although some satellite TV providers offer 1080p on-demand movies as well. To learn more about HD video resolution, see our article that explains HDTV resolution, or watch our HDTV resolution video to get the basics.

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NetflixMore and more TVs can play movies from services like Netflix® and Amazon Video on Demand™.

Q: How can I watch movies and TV shows from Netflix® and other online sources on my TV?
A: More and more TVs are "smart" or Internet-ready, letting you watch Internet content on the biggest and best screen in your home. Many of these TVs include "video streaming," which makes it possible to watch TV shows and movies from the web. To ensure a wide selection of entertainment options, most TV makers have partnered with movie streaming services like Netflix® and Amazon Video on Demand™.

All Internet-ready TVs include an Ethernet port for connecting to your home network. If you'd rather not run a cable to your TV, most of these models have built-in Wi-Fi® to make a wireless connection to your network.

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Q: How can I watch home movies and vacation photos on my TV?
A: A lot of folks store their vacation photos and home movies on computers or connected hard drives. But you don't have to crowd around your computer's small screen to enjoy them. One option for getting your photos on the big screen is AirPlay®. AirPlay capable devices, such as the Apple TV®, allow you to stream photos and music from your Apple computer, iPod® touch, iPad®, or iPhone®.

"DLNA-compatible" TVs are another popular route. They connect to your home network and allow you to access your photos and home movies stored on your computer. The DLNA label means that these TVs use an industry-wide standard for recognizing and playing digital media. Many DLNA-compatible TVs and gaming systems can access photos, videos, and music stored on compatible computers. 

All DLNA-capable TVs include an Ethernet port to connect to your home network, and most have built-in Wi-Fi® so you can connect to your network wirelessly.

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Q: Can I surf the Internet using my HDTV?
A: It depends. Most Internet-ready TVs from the past few years let you access specific online content, like Netflix movies or YouTube™ videos. Besides movie services, common examples of available content include weather, news, social media updates, and sports scores. In addition, recent "smart" TVs include a full web browser for accessing the Internet, although doing so is generally not as quick and convenient as surfing the web with your computer. See our article about Internet-ready TVs for more info.

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antennaOver-the-air HDTV broadcasts offer outstanding picture quality.

Q: What kind of antenna do I need to receive over-the-air HD broadcasts?
A: First, don't worry about finding one that's "specially designed for HDTV." As with analog broadcasts, digital TV broadcasts can be either UHF or VHF. It's a good idea to get an antenna that can receive both, because even though most stations broadcast in the UHF band (channels 14-51), a significant number are in the VHF band (channels 2-13). If you're not sure about your local stations, check out the Consumer Electronics Association's AntennaWeb mapping tool. It will tell you what stations broadcast in your area, where they are in relation to you, and what type of antenna is recommended for your specific location.

For more information, see our article on how to choose and install an antenna for HDTV.

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Q: I'm a cable TV subscriber. What do I need to watch cable programs in HD?
A: There are a couple ways you can watch high-def cable programs. The option that will work best for you depends on the types of HD programs you want to watch, as well as which services are available from your local cable provider. These service providers used to only scramble the signals for premium content like HBO®, Showtime®, and pay-per-view events. But recently, they've been scrambling more and more content. Generally, you can only access scrambled programs by using a cable box. Your local service provider(s) will be able to provide up-to-date details on services and pricing in your area.

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Q: I'm a satellite TV subscriber. What do I need to watch satellite programs in HD?
A: To view high-def shows via satellite, you'll need a subscription that includes HD programming. You'll also need an HD satellite set-top box. These HD boxes often include a built-in DVR for recording high-def programs.

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Q: I'm trimming expenses and considering doing without satellite or cable TV. Do over-the-air high-def broadcasts look as good as HD cable and satellite?
A: All three of these high-def signal types provide excellent picture quality — dramatically clearer and more detailed than standard DVDs and other video sources. All three types are digital video formats which use "data compression" for more efficient use of broadcast bandwidth. Compression reduces the amount of picture data being sent, so all other things being equal, more compression will reduce picture quality. Typically, over-the-air broadcasts use less compression than either satellite or cable TV signals, and in side-by-side comparisons, over-the-air HD nearly always looks noticeably sharper and cleaner.

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Q: Is all high-definition TV content in the 1080i format?
A: No, but most of it is. The bulk of TV production and broadcasting is done at 1080i. However, both ABC's and Fox's HD programming is in 720p and looks great — especially their sports programming.

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Q: I have an HDTV, so whenever the "Available in HD" logo appears on the screen, I'm seeing a high-definition picture, right?
A: No, unfortunately it's not that simple. What that on-screen logo means is that if you have a high-definition TV that is receiving a high-definition signal, you'll be seeing HD. Sources of high-def programming include over-the-air TV broadcasts, and a growing number of cable and satellite channels.

If you're not seeing the sharp, clear picture your HDTV was designed to deliver, there's probably an easy solution. To help you figure it out, check out our article on what you need to get HDTV, or watch our short video that explains how to get HDTV.

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Q: Primetime shows in high-def look great on my TV, but when my local news comes on, the picture isn't as sharp, and it's not widescreen. Why is that?
A: What you're seeing is the difference between high-definition and standard-definition digital broadcasts. It's not unusual for stations to show daytime programs in SD (480i or 480p), and primetime network shows in HD (720p or 1080i).

Most TVs provide channel ID information, including resolution and aspect ratio. HD programs will be labeled "1080i/16:9" or "720p/16:9," while standard-definition shows are generally "480i/4:3." Usually, 480i over-the-air signals look sharper and clearer than standard satellite and cable TV signals, but they definitely don't have the same detail and depth as high-def.

For tips on how to make non-HD pictures look better, please check out our article on improving non-HD picture quality on your HDTV.

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Q: How can I watch local digital broadcasts on my old analog TV?
A: To receive digital TV signals from your local TV stations, any old-fashioned TV (one with an analog-only tuner) needs to be connected to a digital converter box, or replaced by a new TV with a built-in digital tuner.

Of course, digital TV reception is only a concern for viewers who rely on local over-the-air broadcasts received via antenna. Cable TV providers may include local channels even in basic subscription packages. Satellite TV providers typically charge a few dollars extra per month for local channels.

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Q: Why is it that most new TVs with picture-in-picture don't actually let you watch two stations at once?
A: TV manufacturers take two basic approaches to picture-in-picture (PIP). With 1-tuner PIP, the TV has one built-in tuner, so you'll need to connect another component with a built-in tuner (like a DVD recorder) or a stand-alone tuner if you want to watch two different TV broadcasts at once. Actually, with 1-tuner PIP, you can enjoy picture-in-picture with the addition of another video source like a DVD player or camcorder.

A TV with 2-tuner PIP has two built-in tuners, allowing you to watch two different TV broadcasts simultaneously using only the TV.

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Getting the best picture


Q: How can I get rid of those black bars on my TV?
A: Most non-HD video sources use the squarish 4:3 aspect ratio, which doesn't quite fit a 16:9 widescreen HDTV. Some folks stretch or zoom the image to fill up the screen so that they don't have to see the black bars. But if you don't mind the black bars on either side of the picture, we recommend you leave them up. Stretching will distort an already poor signal, and zooming usually makes the image look softer and can further magnify any flaws in the picture.

TV 1

4:3 image on a 16:9 screen

When 4:3 programs are displayed on a 16:9 screen, black or gray bars appear on the sides of the screen — the image is "pillar-boxed."
TV 2

4:3 image stretched to fill a 16:9 screen

One way to get rid of vertical black bars is to use your TV's stretch mode. Some sets stretch the image evenly across the screen (as above), though a few stretch the edges only and leave the center undistorted.
TV 3

4:3 image zoomed to fill a 16:9 screen

Another option is to use the TV's zoom mode to expand the image to fill the screen. This cuts off the top and bottom of the picture, but leaves it undistorted.
TV 4

16:9 image on a 16:9 screen

When you look at the original widescreen version of the image we've been using to show 4:3, you can see just how much of the picture is lost with the 4:3 version.

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Q: My HDTV looks much better than my old TV, but how can I make sure I'm getting the best possible picture?
A: Many new TV owners are so knocked out by these sets' big, bright pictures that it never occurs to them that they might be able to get an even better picture. First, make sure you're actually getting a high-definition signal. Millions of HDTV owners still aren't seeing a true high-definition picture — and unfortunately many of them don't even realize it. To make sure you have all the pieces in place to get a high-def picture on your HDTV, watch our video that covers what you need for HDTV.

Two other areas TV owners should explore to improve picture quality are picture controls and connections. For helpful tips on both topics, see our article on getting the best picture from your TV.

Most HDTV owners still watch a lot of non-HD programs, and because their new sets have larger screens than the old tube TVs they replaced, some viewers are disappointed at the way standard-def TV shows look. Learn how to make the most of lower-quality video signals by reading this article on improving non-HD picture quality on your HDTV.

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Blu-ray playerBlu-ray players are the best source available for high-def video.

Q: I just bought a new TV and now I want to replace my DVD player with a Blu-ray player. Will it play all my DVDs?
A: Yes, Blu-ray players not only deliver stunning high-def video with Blu-ray discs, they also typically do an excellent job upconverting standard DVDs. You'll not only be able to watch your DVD collection, you'll probably find that the picture quality looks better than ever.

For the best picture, be sure to use an HDMI cable between the player and your TV.

For more suggestions about what to look for in a Blu-ray player, see our article on how to choose a Blu-ray player. Or, watch our short video guide to shopping for a Blu-ray player.

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Q: Do I need to worry about screen burn-in with plasma TVs?
A: Screen burn-in was an issue for early plasma TVs. Burn-in could occur when a static image — like a non-widescreen 4:3 image with vertical black bars on the sides, or a scrolling stock or news ticker — remained on screen for several hours. These images actually became etched into the phosphor coating, leaving faint impressions. In recent years, TV makers reduced plasma power consumption and refined the panel technology to minimize the chances of burn-in occurring, while also including the ability to erase burn-in effects. New plasma TVs are virtually immune to screen burn-in. To prevent any possibility of burn-in, plasma owners should follow the manufacturer's guidelines for adjusting the TV's brightness and contrast settings when the TV is new.

For more tips on TV settings, see our article about optimizing your TV's picture.

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Setting up your TV


HDMI cable
HDMI should be your first choice when connecting components to your TV.

Q: What kind of video connection should I use to connect my components to my TV?

A: HDMI should be your connection of choice. This single-cable connection can carry full 1080p video as well as audio. If you run out of HDMI inputs on your TV, or the component you're connecting doesn't have an HDMI output, component video is a good backup. It can also carry high-def video, though you'll need to make a separate audio connection.

For more info, including recommendations for common connection scenarios, check out our article on hooking up your HDTV.

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Q: What should I be aware of when placing my TV?
A: Along with viewing distance, consider viewing height. Ideally, your eyes should be about level with the middle of the screen when you're seated in your normal viewing position. We carry a wide selection of TV stands designed to support flat-panel TVs and raise them to the correct viewing height.

Lighting in your room is another factor that affects your TV's picture. If you do much daytime viewing, daylight shining in through your windows can wash out your TV's picture and also create reflections on the screen. When watching TV at night, lamps and overhead lights can cause similar problems, although they're usually not as severe. You may find that watching with the lights dimmed enhances picture quality.

For more tips on TV placement and room lighting, see our article on choosing the right screen size and placing your TV.

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Q: What's involved in wall-mounting a flat-panel TV? Can I do it myself?
A: Most people who want a flat-panel TV mounted on a wall are after an uncluttered, elegant look. Achieving that means not only installing a wall-mount bracket to hold the TV, but also hiding the power and signal cables running to the TV. If you're comfortable with household tasks like mounting shelving and installing new light fixtures, you can probably handle wall-mounting a TV.

You can watch our video about wall-mounting a flat-panel TV to find out what's involved. Or check out our complete guide to wall-mounting your TV for more details.

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wall-mounted TVThis TV might look like it's mounted too low, but it's actually the ideal height — both for image quality and for comfortable viewing.

Q: Is it OK to mount my TV above my fireplace?
A: While your new TV might look pretty cool mounted over your fireplace, it's definitely a less-than-ideal location. We'll review some of the issues that come up with fireplace mounting, as well as some possible workarounds.

  • Viewing angle: TVs look their best when viewed head-on. If your TV is mounted high up on the wall, you'll be viewing it at an angle. Colors may look somewhat washed out, and black levels won't be as dark. Solution: Choose a tilting wall mount and angle your TV down a few degrees, so you're viewing it more head-on.
  • Neck strain: Mounting your TV up high means that as you watch TV, you'll always be looking up — something which, over time, can be uncomfortable for your neck. Solution: Sit in a recliner, or lay back on your couch so that you don't have to angle your neck upwards.
  • Safe, secure mounting: The heat and smoke from some fireplaces may potentially shorten the lifespan of your TV. Also, if you'll need to mount your TV to brick or masonry, you may need to buy special hardware to securely mount your set. See the wall mount owner's manual for details.

For more tips on TV placement and room lighting, see our article on choosing the right screen size and placement for your TV.

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Q: How can I connect my computer to my TV?
A: If you'd like to connect your computer to your TV to use it as a large monitor, or to view photos and videos stored on your computer, there are a few ways to go about it.

First, the video connection. The easiest route will be to use your computer's HDMI, DVI, or VGA output. We recommend HDMI or DVI, since HDTVs often accept higher resolutions over those connections than VGA. And although most TVs today don't have DVI inputs, you can still go that route if you use a DVI-to-HDMI adapter. (Since DVI doesn't carry audio, you'll still need to make a separate connection for sound — see below.) If you opt for VGA, look for an input on the back of your TV labeled "PC." And if none of these options work with your setup, you can use your computer's VGA output and a VGA-to-component-video adapter to connect it to your TV.

Once you see your computer's display on your TV, you'll need to set it to the right resolution — otherwise, you may see a pixilated or distorted picture. Be sure to use a resolution your TV is designed to handle (see the TV's owner's manual). If you don't see video displaying on your TV, there's a good chance you chose an incompatible resolution. You can tweak resolution settings by going into "System Preferences," and then the "Displays Preferences" pane.

A note for folks using laptops: You'll need go into your computer's menus to "extend" your desktop to a second monitor — this will allow the computer to display video on your TV, as well as its own monitor. On Windows computers, you can access this menu by right-clicking the desktop, selecting "Properties," and then "Settings." Macs running Tiger, Leopard or Snow Leopard will auto-detect the new monitor and either "mirror" or extend your desktop.

If you also want to send audio from your computer to your home theater receiver or TV, and you're not using HDMI, you'll need to make a second connection. Many computer sound cards today include optical or coaxial digital audio outputs that can connect to a receiver. If yours doesn't, you may want to consider upgrading your sound card. Or, you can simply use your computer's headphone output — you'll need a mini plug-to-stereo RCA adapter to connect it to your TV or receiver.

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Q: Should I use my receiver to make video connections?
A: You can simplify your A/V system connections by using your receiver as a "hub" for switching among your source components. That means you connect your Blu-ray player, satellite DVR, video game console, etc. to your receiver, then just make one connection — ideally HDMI — between your receiver and TV. Besides reducing cable clutter, this approach lets you switch sources using your receiver's remote, and you don't have to separately select the audio and video signals. One drawback to this setup is that it means you're often limited to using the same set of picture adjustments for all of your sources. That's fine if they're all of similar quality, but might not be ideal if you have a Blu-ray player and a VCR. Check out our article about connecting your home theater receiver for more info.

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Q: What kind of sound quality can I expect from flat-panel TV speakers?
A: The one drawback to flat-panel TVs is that their super-skinny cabinets don't provide enough room for decent-sounding speakers. The sound from these speakers is typically thin or even tinny, and they just can't play very loud. There are lots of ways to get better sound with your TV, from full surround sound systems to sleek, simple sound bars. Even inexpensive sound bars usually sound much better than TV speakers.

Interested in upgrading the sound quality of your system to match your TV's fantastic picture? See our article describing ways to add great sound to your TV.

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Q: Can I use my TV's speakers as a center channel in my home theater system?
A: No, you really can't, and you wouldn't want to for sound quality reasons (see previous question). Not only are the speakers inside TVs very small, they're powered by equally puny amplifiers. Flat-panel TVs simply can't produce robust sound. Plus, TVs almost never include a speaker-type jack that's compatible with your A/V receiver. If adding a real center speaker isn't an option, check to see if your A/V receiver has a "Phantom" surround mode. This mode re-directs the center-channel information to your front left and right speakers. Phantom mode can be surprisingly effective at creating the illusion of a center speaker.

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