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2007-2014 Chevrolet Tahoe & Suburban, and GMC Yukon & Yukon XL

2007 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 • 2013 • 2014

Chevy Tahoe

In a Nutshell

This article discusses how to install car audio gear in your Tahoe, Yukon, or Suburban. Check it out and then use our vehicle selector to find the gear that will fit your truck.

Stereo replacement is pretty simple, overall, and lots of new stereos will fit the dash, so don't hesitate to get a new receiver and add modern conveniences like Bluetooth® connectivity or a USB input for your phone.

Like most Chevy trucks of this vintage, the speakers are pretty easy to deal with. The door speaker removal and replacement process isn't difficult, but it is somewhat detailed and there is drilling involved. Nothing hard, but still a thing. The rest of the speakers are pretty simple to replace, and once you've done so, you'll really be impressed with the sound.

The factory sub is a pain to remove, and we don't recommend trying it. There are a variety of custom-fit subwoofers from JL Audio and MTX Audio that will give you the improved bass you want and blend into your vehicle's interior. 

Full Story

GMC Yukon XL

Overview of the Tahoe, Yukon, and Suburban

GM's full-size family of SUVs has long been a favorite of big families, outdoor enthusiasts, and hyper-observant men in dark suits and sunglasses. The're comfortable, capable, and thoroughly practical for anyone who needs this much SUV. No wonder they've become a (pardon us) suburban staple.

The Suburban/Yukon XL/etc. is a big vehicle. Really big. If you have more people to move than this vehicle can hold, you need to buy a passenger van. If you have more stuff, you need to rent a box truck. For most people, though, there's more than enough space in these trucks to haul everything that matters in comfort and style. By any name, the Suburban is a classic piece of American automotive design.

The Tahoe and Yukon are (slightly) smaller than the Suburban and the aptly named Yukon XL. Stereo-wise, there's almost no difference between them, so we've lumped them all together in one super-sized article. The factory stereos were adequate, but there's plenty of room for improvement. Thankfully, these trucks are generally easy to work on, and there's a lot of aftermarket gear available.

This article is an overview of your vehicle's audio system and its upgrade options. If you're looking for step-by-step instructions on how to install a car stereo or speakers in your SUV, there's nothing better than our exclusive Crutchfield MasterSheet™. This detailed, well-illustrated document is free with your Crutchfield order, or you can purchase one separately for $9.99.

Chevy Tahoe radio

The Tahoe/Yukon/Suburban's rather basic base radio (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Factory stereo system

The Tahoe and Yukon could be ordered with several different stereo systems, including a 6 CD in-dash Bose® system and options to add navigation, rear seat audio, DVD systems, or satellite radio. It’s possible to add to or completely replace any of these stereo systems fairly easily, though getting to the amplifier and 6-1/2" subwoofer of the Bose system requires some extensive teardown of the interior.

Some integration adapters we sell let you keep factory features you may have in these vehicles, like the rear seat entertainment system, backup camera, or Bluetooth® hands-free calling. It's also possible to replace (and improve) every one of them with the majority of receivers and other gear we sell.

Chevy Tahoe Bose radio

The optional big-screen nav radio (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Replacing your factory radio

Removing the stock receiver isn't terribly difficult, but you should work carefully and patiently to avoid damaging the trim pieces. Starting at the bottom edge, pry around the edges of the receiver trim panel to release the retaining clips. These clips are very tight, so don't succumb to the temptation to use brute force. They'll come, but finesse is the best approach.

Once you've gotten the trim panel off, remove eight 7mm screws securing the switch panel, the temperature controls, and the radio. It's okay to let the switch panel and temperature controls hang while you pull out and disconnect the radio.

Single-DIN and most double-DIN aftermarket receivers will fit nicely in your truck with the help of a mounting kit. Crutchfield includes this kit and an antenna adapter at a very nice discount with most orders, along with our step-by-step Crutchfield MasterSheet instructions.

Some double-DIN (4" tall) radios will not fit because the wiring harness interferes with the dash substructure. Check our product photos to make sure the radio you're buying does not have wire harnesses or RCA connectors that plug into the top half of the back of the radio. If you have any questions, our Crutchfield Advisors are here to help.

In order to connect a new stereo to your truck's electronics, you'll also need a special integration adapter. This adapter is not free, but we offer a very nice discount if you purchase it with your new stereo. This integration adapter lets you retain your warning chimes, keeps the Bose amplifier working, and retains the OnStar functionality (if either are present…). You might also need a relay to keep your audible turn signals working with your new car stereo. If your SUV is equipped with the GM Rear Seat Entertainment (RSE) system, you'll definitely need a separate adapter to connect it to the audio/video output on your new receiver

Since installing a new receiver can disable the warning chimes in your Yukon or Tahoe, we strongly advise that you use the recommended integration adapter to retain these chimes. We will not provide technical support for any installation that does not utilize the recommended adapter.

The optional factory DVD system features a flip-down screen in a roof console and two pairs of wireless headphones. A secondary set of controls for the radio and DVD system are housed in the rear of the center console, and some models include an A/V input for adding more gear, like a gaming console. Creating some aftermarket movie magic in your SUV is relatively easy, thanks to products like flip-down overhead monitors with DVD players or replacement headrest screens that match the truck’s interior. Our Outfit My Car tool will help you find what you need for your SUV.

Tools needed for stereo removal: Panel tool, 7mm socket, ratchet, and extension

Steering wheel audio controls

It's relatively easy to retain the steering wheel audio controls when you install a new stereo in your full-size GM SUV. When you enter your vehicle information, our database will choose the adapter you need to make your factory steering wheel controls work with your new receiver.

Shop for car stereos that fit your Chevrolet Suburban

Chevy Tahoe front door speaker

The front door speakers aren't hard to replace, but there are several steps involved (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Replacing your factory speakers

Your Tahoe or Yukon is equipped with speakers in the front and rear doors. If you have the Bose system, you'll also find speakers in the dash and the front and rear pillars.

Chevy Tahoe front door speaker

Removing the front door speaker (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Front door speakers

The front door speakers are 6-3/4" models that can be replaced with same-size or 6-1/2" aftermarket speakers. There are a couple of moderately challenging aspects to the process, but they're well within the capabilities of a reasonably skilled do-it-yourselfer.

You'll need to remove the door panels, of course, and while that's not terribly difficult, there are a lot of "small" tasks (removing the factory speakers from their mounting brackets, for example) involved in the process. Work carefully, and keep track of the various trim pieces and screws you remove while you're taking the door apart.

No matter which size you choose, replacement speaker adapter brackets are required, and they're included free with your speaker purchase. A wiring harness is not available, though, so you'll either need to splice the speaker wires or connect the speaker to the vehicle wires using a set of Posi-Products speaker connectors. Whether you use your truck off-road or not, the latter is recommended because the connection is much more secure.

The removal and replacement process isn't difficult, but it is somewhat detailed and there is drilling involved. Complete, illustrated instructions can be found in the Crutchfield MasterSheet included with your order. If you're even slightly handy around the home and garage, you know how to use a power drill. That said, we should remind you to be extremely careful when drilling in your vehicle. Be aware of things such as wiring, windows, fuel lines and safety devices. And, of course, check (and re-check) the drilling depth and location before you drill.

We frequently suggest foam speaker baffles for other big vehicles, but with these GM SUV's, we strongly recommend them. These big, thick doors can waste a lot of great sound, and this is an inexpensive way to rein it back in. These baffles are easy to install, and they'll give you improved performance while also protecting your speakers.

One last thing: Your new speakers might include mounting screws, but then again, they might not. Check your packaging and, if needed, make that run to the hardware store before you start working.

Tools needed: Panel tool, socket wrench, 7mm & 10mm drivers, flat blade screwdriver, drill & 1/8" bit.

Chevy Tahoe rear door speaker

The rear doors are a little easier to work with in these SUVs (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Rear door speakers

The rear speakers are a little easier to work with. As with the front speakers, the rears are a non-standard factory GM size, but they can be replaced with a host of 6-1/2" or 6-3/4" aftermarket models.

You'll need to do a bit of drilling here, too, but it's the same basic job that it was up front. You should check for mounting screws in your rear speaker packaging, too. Detailed instructions for the rear door speaker installation can also be found in your Crutchfield MasterSheet.

We highly recommend the use of speaker baffles in this location. They're an inexpensive way to reduce rattling, protect your speakers and get the best possible performance.

Tools needed: Panel tool, socket wrench, 7mm & 10mm drivers, flat blade screwdriver, drill & 1/8" bit.

Chevy Tahoe front pillar tweeter

The front pillar tweeter (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Front pillar speakers

The Bose stereo system includes one tweeter mounted in each A-pillar. These speakers are reasonably easy to remove, but you’ll need to do a bit of work to install the replacements.

There's no wiring harness adapter made for this location, so you'll need a set of Posi-Products connectors to hook everything up. You'll also need to create mounting brackets, and a pair of our universal backstraps are a dandy DIY solution.

Tools needed: small flat blade screwdriver

Chevy Suburban Bose dash speaker

The Bose-only center dash speaker (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Center dash speaker

If your truck is equipped with the Bose stereo package, there's a speaker in the center of the dash beneath a grille. It's a tight spot, but a number of 3-1/2" aftermarket speakers will fit here. Use a panel tool to pry up the four metal clips that secure the grille, remove the 7mm screws holding the speaker in place, then take out the old speaker.

The key here is to work carefully. The same advice holds true any time you're removing plastic panels, but it's especially important here. A slip on a door panel is one thing, but a massive boo-boo in the center of the dash will annoy you every time you get in the truck! This is another location that would benefit from a foam speaker baffle.

Tools needed: Small flat blade screwdriver

Chevy Tahoe rear pillar speaker

The rear pillar tweeters (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Rear pillar tweeters

The small rear pillar tweeters are, like their counterparts up front, reasonably easy to reach. You'll need to pry away some panels, but that's not terribly difficult. You'll need a mounting bracket, so we recommend bending and shaping our universal backstrap to hold the new tweeters in place.

Tools needed: Phillips screwdriver

Shop for speakers that fit your Chevrolet Suburban

JL Audio Stealthbox

A close-up view of the JL Audio Stealthbox.

Bass in your Tahoe, Yukon, or Suburban

The factory subwoofer is an oblong piece that's roughly the size of a 6-3/4" speaker. It's located in the center console, which is nice, but if you want to replace it, the entire console must be removed. That is not so nice. In fact, it's a very difficult process that provides plenty of opportunities to damage the truck's interior. Because of all this, your best choice is to simply bypass the factory sub and look into the numerous aftermarket solutions available for these vehicles.

There are a variety of subs from JL Audio and MTX Audio that will give you the improved bass you want while also blending into your vehicle's interior. They're all slightly different, but they all sound very impressive. Installing them takes some skill, though, so you should consult a Crutchfield Advisor before ordering. Due to the complexity of the installation, this is a case in which we strongly suggest turning the work over to a pro. To learn more about these enclosures, visit our Outfit My Car feature and enter your vehicle information.

You can also add more sound up front, with the help of Q-Forms Kick Panel Pods. As you might imagine, these unloaded enclosures install in the kick panels, and they're available in three colors to match your truck's interior. Q-Forms hold 6-1/2" speakers in an ideal position, angling them to maximize sound quality. Since they're located near your feet, the distance from your ears to each speaker becomes closer to equal, creating a superior soundstage. Q-Forms do not come with pre-cut holes and installing them can be a bit challenging, so check with a Crutchfield Advisor before you order.

There's plenty of room for boom in the cargo area of your SUV, but there's obviously a bit less if you have third-row seats. The amount of subwoofer power you need depends on your musical tastes and how you use your truck every day. If you want to squeeze every bit of bass out of your music, you have room for a subwoofer enclosure, plus the amplifiers you'll need to power your subs.

If you're just looking to add richness and depth to your tunes, you can install something a bit smaller that'll still leave you some room for hauling things. And, if you need those third-row seats or place a lot of value on the "utility" part of your sport utility vehicle, you can always opt for a powered subwoofer. You'll get a surprising amount of sound, plus you'll still be able to stock up at the warehouse store on the way home from the kids' soccer match.

Shop for vehicle-specific subwoofers for your Chevrolet Suburban

Dynamat

Dynamat will help seal in your sound (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Other options for your Tahoe, Yukon, or Suburban

The aftermarket offers an amazing variety of other ways to improve your Tahoe, Yukon, or Suburban. Here are some of the ways Crutchfield can help.

Sound deadening

Like most big, boxy SUVs, the Tahoe/Yukon/Suburban can get a bit loud at speed. To combat wind noise and road roar, you can install Dynamat in the doors and (if you install a big sub) rear hatch area. This sound-deadening material will keep the noise out and allow you to really enjoy your music.

Rear-view camera

With a vehicle this large, it's important to be aware of your surroundings. A rear-view camera is a big help when you're backing up in a crowded parking lot. We offer cameras from Kenwood, Alpine, Pioneer, and more. Some are designed to work with same-brand receivers only, but others come with a composite video connector and will work with almost any video receiver.

Security

Installing a security system in your truck isn't easy (security systems rarely are), but it's definitely a good idea. Our Crutchfield Advisors can help figure out what you need to get the job done, but we usually recommend taking your car and new gear to a professional installer.

Find the audio gear that fits your car or truck

Visit our Outfit My Car page and enter your vehicle information to see stereos, speakers, subs, and other audio accessories that will work in your vehicle.

  • Noah from Port Chester

    Posted on 1/1/2017

    Older Burbs/GMT800 trucks, like my 03 Suburban 1500 LT 4WD 5.3 FLEX with Bose (I am not sure whether regular or premium but some 1 disc whose speakers do not rattle at full volume) and OnStar of hopefully digital-ready vintage (i.e. not an 01 like my last) are worthy and eligible to be equally treated in this style. This would have enabled my purchase within three months of the relevant system, not unlike the upgraded one I saw in an 06 Tahoe PPV. So, like many, I'd like a writeup on this vintage (00-06) Chevrolet Suburban, which is numerous, popular, enduring, available cheap as dirt (and therefore pimpable)? Better spent $200, $500, $1000 on integrating an Android/Apple 2DIN head end and backup camera with onboard mic, chimes and other services unaffected, or whatever menu of upgrades is available. Previous owner preferred a DVD player to a sunroof so I suppose might look at upgrades for that, &/or integration. But chiefly need is for smartphone integration, apps, nav and backup cam, maybe 4G/WiFi, in a new head end, replacing existing stereo head end and with harnesses/adapters to reuse onboard vehicle functions (would not need GM OnStar service).

  • Jon Paulette from Crutchfield

    Posted on 1/2/2017

    Noah, That's a great idea for an article and we'll definitely get one done. But you don't have to wait for the article to update your stereo system! Give us a call and let one of our experts help you find the right receiver for your truck.

  • Ryan from Cottage Grove

    Posted on 2/8/2017

    I have the factory camera showing on the rear view mirror of my 2013 Yukon XL but now that I've placed a Kenwood stereo I want the camera view in there. Where is a good place to tap into the camera wires in this vehicle? They do not currently go to a plug behind the stereo that I can tell.

  • Jon Paulette from Crutchfield

    Posted on 2/9/2017

    Ryan, If you bought your gear from Crutchfield, you can call Tech Support for free help troubleshooting your system. If you purchased your equipment elsewhere, you can still get expert Crutchfield Tech Support - 90 days-worth for only $30. Check out our tech support page for details.

  • KB

    Posted on 10/11/2017

    Want to change out my 2007 Suburban's radio with a bluetooth connection for my phone and possibly a nav screen what do you recommend. Thank you.

  • Jon Paulette from Crutchfield

    Posted on 10/11/2017

    KB, I've sent your question to our sales team, and they'll be contacting you via email soon. For immediate help, you can contact them via phone or chat.

  • Mike from Lakeland

    Posted on 12/10/2017

    I accidentally shattered the screen on my factory big-screen nav radio/DVD /rear entertainment system. Is there a replacement that will give me full function like before? I want the rear controls, DVD player, steering wheel controls, and backup camera to work just as they should

  • Jon Paulette from Crutchfield

    Posted on 12/10/2017

    Mike, That's a bummer, but we can help. I've sent your question to our sales team, and they'll be contacting you via email soon. For immediate help, you can contact them via phone or chat.

  • Blake A Campbell from Columbus

    Posted on 1/10/2018

    I have a 2014 Tahoe Z71 and took it to a local shop to replace the blown speakers in the second row doors. They told me since I have BOSE system, that I need to stick with BOSE for replacements to get the best sound since it is all wired together. Is this true? Which speakers can I purchase from you to just swap out and have the same sound?

  • Jon Paulette from Crutchfield

    Posted on 1/11/2018

    Blake, Nothing sound more like Bose speakers than other Bose speakers, but you don't have to use them if you don't want to. Give us a call and talk to one of our advisors. We can help you choose the right speakers for your Tahoe.

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