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Boston Acoustics Recepter Radio® HD

HD Radio/FM/AM stereo radio

14 Reviews

Item # 065HDRADIO

This item is no longer available.

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Overview

Our take on the Boston Acoustics Recepter Radio® HD

You've probably heard about digital satellite radio, but did you know that some of your favorite AM and FM stations are also broadcasting digitally? HD Radio™ technology enables markedly improved sound quality — FM approaches CD-quality sound, and AM resembles current FM sound quality.

You've probably heard about digital satellite radio, but did you know that some of your favorite AM and FM stations are also broadcasting digitally? HD Radio™ technology enables markedly improved sound quality — FM approaches CD-quality sound, and AM resembles current FM sound quality.

The Boston Acoustics Recepter Radio® HD lets you enjoy these free, over-the-air digital broadcasts to the fullest. A multi-line display shows song title, artist, station name and other text information normally accompanying HD Radio broadcasts. The Recepter features wide-range drivers optimized specifically for radio, and special processing for natural bass response. A pair of speakers — one built into the radio, and one in a separate enclosure — deliver spacious stereo sound.

The simple front panel makes it easy to operate the radio and clock functions. You get dual independent wake-up alarms — handy for working couples. The alarm controls are top-mounted, with the programming buttons protected by a flip-up panel to prevent accidental resetting. A built-in capacitor provides a battery-free memory backup — you won't lose your radio's settings if the power goes out. And the Recepter's highly sensitive AM/FM tuner pulls in your favorite stations cleanly and without distortion.

I bought this for my primary stereo while in Bahrain augmenting the war. I found the sound excellent, however reception was not great for Bahrain with the included antenna. I expect to enjoy the HD stations when I return to VA. Beautiful style and nice features.

Marc, Virginia Beach, VA

What's in the Box:

  • Silver HD clock radio
  • Second speaker with attached 20" cable
  • 10' Speaker extension cable (male RCA on one end and female RCA on the other)
  • Switch mode power supply with attached 6' output cord (AC in/12 volt DV 3 amp output)
  • 6' AC power cord
  • 3' FM wire antenna
  • AM loop antenna with attached 76' cord
  • Credit card style remote
  • CR 2025 battery
  • Manual
  • Pictural quick set up guide
  • Product Registration card

Product Highlights:

  • stereo AM/FM clock radio
  • receives HD Radio broadcasts and multicasts
  • 20 AM/FM tuner presets
  • minijack audio input for connecting external source
  • dual wake-up alarms
  • sleep timer (up to 60 minutes)
  • adjustable snooze
  • credit card-sized remote
  • radio: 7-3/4"W x 4-3/8"H x 7-3/4"D
  • satellite speaker: 4-7/16"W x 4-3/8"H x 6-5/16"D
  • warranty: 1 year
  • Our 60-day money-back guarantee
Reviews

Boston Acoustics Recepter Radio® HD Reviews

Average Customer Review(s):

(14 Reviews)

Good Sound for its size

Marc from Virginia Beach, VA on 6/15/2007

Crutchfield Customer Review (What's this?)

I bought this for my primary stereo while in Bahrain augmenting the war. I found the sound excellent, however reception was not great for Bahrain with the included antenna. I expect to enjoy the HD stations when I return to VA. Beautiful style and nice features.

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Boston Acoustics Recepter Radio® HD

Dennis from Silver Spring, MD on 12/31/2006

Crutchfield Customer Review (What's this?)

My advice -- heed those warnings about sensitivity problems that are posted at various places on the web by other reviewers. I live just a little over 12 miles from downtown Washington, D.C. and about 35 miles from downtown Baltimore. This is an area that has at least 15 stations broadcasting HD channels. But I was unable to receive any of them consistently and reliably until I installed an FM antenna in the attic. Without the dedicated antenna (and it's a fairly large 6-element antenna, not the little amplified Radio Shack item), I experienced frequent, annoying signal dropouts on the HD channels. It still isn't perfect, and I still can't receive most of the Baltimore HD broadcasts, but it's a lot better.<BR> Having said that, I'll also say that the radio sounds fine, and I'm delighted with the HD channels I am getting. The radio is now on in our house much more than it used to be. But if you buy it, expect to undertake an antenna project in order to get satisfactory performance. In many areas, I would think a rooftop antenna would be needed.

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Excellent Sound Quality and Good Station Reception

Cynthia from Atlanta, GA on 12/1/2006

Crutchfield Customer Review (What's this?)

I already had a Boston Acoustics Receptor non-HD radio and was very pleased with its ability to lock-in FM stations which I was not able to receive reliably on other radios. So when my local NPR station began broadcasting in HD, I purchased the HD version of the Boston radio. It was easy to set up and use. The sound quality is excellent and I am able to pull-in all of the HD radio stations which are available in my area (Atlanta, GA).

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BIG SECRETS FOR GREAT LITTLE RADIO

wxman from NEW JERSEY on 9/24/2006

This review will solve all your problems. Read on. The only thing bad about this great product (especially now that it's less than $300) is the owners manual. Here's the trick about the two biggest complaints -- lack of HD Disable / analog lock and inability to control tone. What you do is hold the "clock" button for about 10 seconds until a secret menu appears. At that point you have access to all sorts of goodies, including a full graphic equalizer. Separately, if you want to lock analog on just push both alarm buttons simultanesouly. Obviously BA doesn't want "ordinary" users to do these things, so do at your own risk -- I take no responsibility (there are things in the secret menu that shouldn't be messed with) -- although the secret menu allows you to easily reset factory defaults. Why BA wouldn't tell users how to lock analog -- by far the biggest user gripe -- is beyond me. Not knowing this almost caused me to return the unit because my favorite station would annoyingly drift between HD and analog. Now that you know, everyone can enjoy this marvel -- and that secret menu is way cool!

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Good, some quirks, expensive

MC from Baltimore MD on 7/19/2006

I bought this radio because I wanted a high-quality, simple, elegant table radio with some features such as a sleep timer, wake-up alarm, remote control, etc. In that sense, I am not disappointed.<BR><BR>The radio has excellent bass, is elegant and attractive, and generally functions well. The sound is surprisingly good for such a small unit. The display could be clearer and larger.<BR><BR>The disappointments are weak treble, poor sensitivity in AM and FM (the inexpensive Sony "shelf system" that it replaced has much better FM sensitivity), and the inability to force to analog mode. The latter is not much of a problem here as even in this large metro area (Baltimore-Washington), there are only a few HD stations in range; I can't receive Washington stations, about 40 miles away.<BR><BR>The radio has one nuisance defect, for which I returned it to Crutchfield and got another one, but it also has the problem. When I switch the radio to AUX input, after a few seconds the "AUX" disappears from the display, although it functions just fine. At this point, it is not possible to switch OUT of "AUX"; the receiver must be turned off and turned on again, then immediately switched to a different input, i.e. FM, AM, etc. It seems to be a function of the firmware that controls the display and inputs not being programmed quite right.<BR><BR>The price, at $300 before rebate seems high to me. If I had to do it over again, I'd buy the little Tivoli audio radio for $119.<BR><BR>

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Very Pleased

Ray from Dallas, TX on 4/27/2006

I think that this is a great instrument and would buy it all over again without hesitation. Many of the suggestions for improvements posted by others are quite valid, but don't get lost in the trees and miss the forest. I think the sound produced by this small radio is great. Rich bass. Nice treble. Very good reception in Dallas, with most every radio station coming in strong in HD at our house.<BR><BR>I, too, had to replace the radio after the first one failed to produce any sound after a week of use. I had an external FM antenna plugged in to it tied to a rooftop, and we had a thunderstorm that night, so it's possible a surge through the antenna fried it, but all of the other signs of life on it besides sound seemed to work fine. In any event, Crutchfield replaced it immediately. Great service from them.

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HD or not to HD. This really confuses me.

Anthony from Brooklyn, NY on 3/26/2006

Had a chance to use this radio for awhile. Im not really sure about the glowing reviews I keep reading for it here. Im more with the guy who said its just as worse as a regular radio cause I cant get no reception in my office either. "HD" indeed.<BR><BR>As for me I cannot take all this stuff, "Satellite" radio such as XM or Sirius, and "Wi-Fi" radio that will be able to play internet stations wirelessly such as the upcoming Roku Labs Soundbridge Radio and NOW "HD" Radio. Free digital radio, that is high clarity with no subscriber fees. <BR><BR>What the heck? What are you going to have? 15 table radios in your house for everything?<BR><BR>Give me a break, Im all for having choices, but this is ridicoulous. If you are smart, disregard what everyone else is saying when they tell you to "spring for it". My advice to you is no,no,no. <BR><BR>TRUST ME! its only around the corner that they will make a combo "HD AND XM or Sirius" radio that will be able to play the free HD content as well as pick up subscription satellite broadcasts as well. NOW THAT MAKES SENSE. <BR><BR>If youre going to even bother introducing so called "new technology" like this you may as well have made it BOTH a "HD" reciever as well as a satellite radio reciever too right off the bat, no screwing around.<BR><BR>This doesnt make sense at all, unless like I said,you LIKE to own 20 radios, that do all sorts of different things. Trust me, wait till the industry comes to thier senses and at least makes owning "HD" feasible and commonsensical by at least combining it,with a satellite compatable radio. Dont let anyone, even Crutchfield into sweet talking you into getting one. Peace.

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Receptor HD Radio

georgen from Iowa on 3/23/2006

Crutchfield Customer Review (What's this?)

The Receptor Radio HD is pretty decent sounding. I have no regrets in buying one, but Id like to make the following suggestions to BA to consider. <BR><BR>As others have suggested, I, too, expected more features for a radio in its price point. For example, there are no bass and treble controls, unless you count the bass rolloff which is accessable in the setup menu. The average radio user is not going to hunt for the remote fob each time they want to adjust a station.<BR><BR>The Tuning and Volume controls are reversed from normal convention. <BR><BR>There should be the ability to keep the station in analog mode, in the event the digital signal is marginal. Otherwise, the radio blends in and out of digital mode, and if the station is not utilizing the 8.4 second delay in their analog signal, the audio jumps back and forth like a skipping CD player.<BR><BR>The HD status information on the display is too small.<BR><BR>The sensitivity of the radio could be improved on the AM band. (The transition from analog to digital on AM is remarkable. Almost FM quality.) An external loop antenna (supplied) must be used for reliable AM IBOC. <BR><BR>Tuning an HD radio station from the lower end of the dial causes the radio to immediately play the analog signal first, then it blends to the HD channel. Further clockwise tuning causes the channel to change to the HD-2, HD-3 channels as one would expect. However, tuning from the top of the dial down to the HD channel causes an 8 second silence delay until the HD-3 channel can be acquired first, then counterclockwise tuning changes the channel to HD-1. <BR><BR>I also suggest to reduce the price to about half (or more!) of what it is

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HD Radio not quite ready for prime time

Ian from Seattle, WA on 2/15/2006

Crutchfield Customer Review (What's this?)

I received my Boston Acoustics HD Radio today. Actually its the second one: the first one was dead on arrival. Crutchfield were great in dealing with it and getting me a new one quickly. Initial impressions are that HD Radio is quite good but not brilliant, not yet anyway.<BR><BR>First off, the Boston Recepter HD Radio is expensive. Considering I could get a DAB radio for around $70 in the UK, HD Radio is way over priced. Prices need to fall a long way before people will make the switch to HD Radio. <BR><BR>As far as the radio itself goes, its got great reception, good little speakers with lots of bass and feels fairly solid but I wouldnt expect anything less for the money.<BR><BR>One nice thing about HD radio is the way they have seamlessly blended it with regular FM tuning. You get to tune to the same analog station and then it switches seamlessly over to an HD signal and offers you extra sub-channels. I say seamlessly because (i) you can actually hear the transition and (ii) some local stations havent figured out the 5s delay then need to add to the analog feed so that the cross fade from analog to digital is smooth and doesnt take you back 5s in time!<BR><BR>During this fade from FM to HD you can really hear the benefit of HD radio - the background hiss of FM signals fades away to nothing. This seems to be the main benefit of HD radio. But heres the gotcha ... unlike DAB where the signal really does sound like CD quality, all of the HD Radio channels I listened to here were sending the same post-compressor signal to the HD Radio equipment at the studio! So it sounds like good FM not CD quality audio.

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nice sound, terrible reception

mrcomment from Las Vegas on 2/2/2006

The radio has a pleasing sound for such a small unit. Controls are intuitive. The reception is lousy though. I can't pick up any HD Radio stations in my office and it is worse than my analog radio for regular stations. Also seems to get stuck when I press too many buttons. Save your money and buy several year's worth of XM or Sirius.

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A Jewel

John from Camden, Maine on 1/11/2006

Crutchfield Customer Review (What's this?)

Have had my radio for a month. A jewel. Brilliant clarity with great balance across sound spectrum and more base output than you might think possible. If you love music you will be thrilled when radio locks on a HD broadcast for the first time. Spring for it. You won't be disappointed.

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One Great Little Radio

Bob from Fall River, WI on 1/9/2006

Crutchfield Customer Review (What's this?)

Bought this radio in December of 05. I am located in a rural location in the middle of WI and I am so surprized by the reception. We are picking up HD stations from Milwaukee, Madison, Chicago and even on some days Indiana. The sound is fantastic. The sub stations are great as well. If you like DXing this radio is a lot of fun. If you like great sounding FM it can't be beat.

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Great radio; expensive

Deane from San Jose, CA on 1/2/2006

Crutchfield Customer Review (What's this?)

I bought the Boston Acoustics Recepter HD about three weeks ago. I like it very much - it's attractive, the controls are pleasant and intuitive, and it has very sensitive FM reception. HD radio sounds great compared to regular FM, and it turns out that one of my local stations plays commercial-free jazz on a subchannel - much better than the fluff they play on the commercial channel! The sound quality is excellent. I use the HD as a nightstand radio-alarm clock, but it's powerful enough to fill a room. My wife has taken to it with no issues. Only caveats, it's very expensive. And I wished the display would auto-dim at night (it has a manual dimmer). But I would definitely buy it again.

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HD Radio is more than just great sound!

LS from Atlanta, GA on 1/2/2006

The new Receptor HD receives HD (digital) radio signals from regular over-the-air radio stations. The new digital signals are clear and sound great--no static. But the best thing about this digital radio is its ability to receive multiple digital channels from each station!<BR><BR>Several FM stations in Atlanta are already multi-casting, which means that 94.9, for example, actually carries multiple digital radio stations offering different programming. Some of the stations seem to be playing similar formats with different playlist orders, and others are adding completely new formats for the additional digital channels. The net result of digital radio seems to be that it will double or triple the number of radio stations, giving picky consumers like me more choices in over-the-air radio.<BR><BR>The radio allows you to select the additional channels easily by breaking-out a radio station with as many additional channels as they are broadcasting, for example, 94.9-1, 94.9-2, 94.9-3, etc. The first channel is always a copy of the station's analog signal. It takes about 5 seconds after you tune-in to a station for the radio to acquire the digital signal (it instantly acquires the analog signal). There is no analog version for the additional digital channels, so you hear about 5 seconds of nothing before the radio tunes-in to one of these channels.<BR><BR>Now I'm just waiting for our local NPR station to start multi-casting so I can catch my favorite NPR programs at different times (hurry up WABE)!

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Details

Hands-on research

Product Research

Features
Satellite Speaker

Features

HD Radio: HD Radio is digital FM and AM broadcasting, allowing you to enjoy your same favorite FM and AM stations with digital sound quality. FM stations offer near CD-quality sound and AM stations sound like today's analog FM stations. Because the transmission is digital, multi-path distortion (a common problem with analog radio, receiving signal reflections slightly later than the direct signal) is eliminated. Stations broadcasting HD radio can also pass along text information, such as artist name, song title, weather, traffic, etc. Another benefit of FM HD radio is a station's ability to multicast, broadcast multiple programs (up to seven) using their existing frequency. The display shows multicast stations with the frequency followed by the multicast number, 107.1-1, 107.1-2, 107.1-3, etc.

Tuner: The Boston Acoustics Recepter radio has a highly sensitive AM/FM digital tuner. It can pull in weak FM stations while its high selectivity allows it to separate closely-spaced stations clearly. The tuning knob makes it easy to manually tune to your favorite stations.

Presets: The Recepter radio features 20 station presets for your favorite AM and FM stations, including primary and multicast HD stations. Once you set the preset stations, you can quickly tune only the preset stations with a turn of the tuning knob.

Antenna Inputs: This unit is equipped with a built-in AM antenna. External FM wire and AM loop antennas are also included. The FM antenna input on the back of the radio is a threaded coaxial jack (75Ω) and the AM antenna input has spring terminals. When using the external AM antenna, first disconnect the internal antenna from the spring terminals.

Speakers/Amplifier: The Recepter features wide-range drivers, specifically designed for this radio, with a rear-firing ports to enhance the bass output. These high-performance speakers are coupled with an actively-equalized amplifier that uses Boston BassTrac circuitry for full, satisfying sound, even at low volume. The result is a unit that delivers smooth, natural response and room-filling sound despite its small size. When placed near a wall the bass may be too pronounced, in this case the bass trim function can be used to turn the bass down.

Display: The unit's large easy-to-read display clearly shows the station frequency, preset number, HD radio text information, clock, and alarm/sleep status. If desired, the display can be dimmed. The display dimensions are 2-1/2" wide and 1-1/4" high.

Dual Alarms: The radio features two independent wake-up alarms, each of which can be set to music or tone. When the alarm sounds, the snooze function will silence the alarm for 10 minutes. If you push the snooze button again within 3 seconds, you can add another 5 minutes to the snooze time, up to a maximum of 60 minutes.

Sleep Timer: You can set the unit's sleep timer to play the radio for a preset amount of time, then turn itself off. The sleep timer can be set for 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, or 60 minutes.

Auxiliary Input: A mini-jack input (1/8") on the back of the radio allows you to play an external source through the Recepter.

Headphone Output: There is mini-jack (1/8") headphone output on the back of the radio. When headphones are plugged in the speakers are muted.

Satellite Speaker

Satellite Speaker: The included second speaker completes a two channel stereo system. The satellite speaker is connected to the main radio using the attached 20" cable which terminates with a male RCA plug. A 10' RCA extension is also included to offer greater placement flexibility and improve stereo separation.

Dimensions:

  • Width: 4.398"
  • Height: 4.345
  • Depth: 6.301"

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