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Drifting Techniques

A Glossary

Drift

Braking drift
Performed by tail braking into a corner, resulting in loss of grip and then blanced through steering and throttle motions. Note that this is mainly for medium to low-speed corners.

Clutch drift
Performed by depressing the clutch pedal on approach or during a mild drift, then popping the clutch to give a sudden jolt through the driveline to upset rear traction.

Dirt drop drift
Performed by dropping the rear tires off the road into the dirt to maintain or gain drift angle without losing power or speed and to set up for the next turn. Note that this technique is very useful for low horsepower cars.

E-brake drift
A very basic technique in which the driver pulls the E-brake (emergency-brake) to induce rear traction loss and balances the drift through steering and throttle play. Note that this can also be used to correct errors or fine tune drift angles.

Faint drift
Performed by rocking the car towards the outside of a turn and then using the rebound of grip to throw the car into the normal cornering direction. This is a rally racing technique used to change vehicle attitudes during cornering, mainly on tight mountain corners.

FF drift
FF drift, or front wheel drive drift, is a technique in which the E-brake as well as steering and braking techniques are used to balance the car through a corner. Note that the pulling the E-brake is the main technique used to balance the drift.

Jump drift
A technique in which the rear tire on the inside of a turn or apex is bounced over a curb to lose traction resulting in oversteer.

Kansei drift
Performed at race speeds when, upon entering a high speed corner, a driver lifts his foot off the throttle to induce a mild oversteer and then blances the drift throught steering and throttle motions. Note that the car used for this style of drift should be a neutral-balanced car so that the oversteer will induce itself. If the car plows through any turn, the technique will not work.

Long slide drift
Performed by pulling the E-brake through a straight to start a high angle drift and to holding this to set up for the turn ahead. Note that this can only be done at high speed.

Power-over
Performed when entering a corner and using full throttle to produce heavy oversteer (tail slide) through the turn; this requires horsepower.

Shift lock
Performed by letting the revs drop upon downshifting into a corner, and then releasing the clutch to put stress on the driveline to slow the rear tires — inducing an oversteer. This is similar to pulling the E-brake through a turn and should be performed on wet surfaces to minimize damage to the driveline.

Swaying drift
A slow side-to-side, faint-like drift where the rear end sways back and forth down a straight-away.

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